Fashion loves bicycling, and there’s no end to the creativity with which designers, stylists and merchants show it. With spring less than a month away (hurray!), we’ve rounded up some of our favorite current fashion campaigns that also celebrate the beauty and fun of riding a bicycle. And while we’re at it, here’s a question that’s been dogging us: Why isn’t the bicycling industry borrowing some pages from this lifestyle playbook, where feelings trump features in spreading bike bliss?

Hermes: Sporting Life (above): Fashion photographer Nathaniel Goldberg shot this campaign for the Hermes Spring/Summer 2013 collection on the serene shores of Lake Como in Italy. Bicycling, badminton, swimming and skateboarding link the luxury brand’s fashions and accessories with care-free summer leisure.  The bicycle, in lacquered stainless steel with leather details, is also by Hermes. (h/t into the fashion)

Free People - Girls on Bikes

Free People: Girls on Bikes — Free People, which in 2011 hung colorful parades of bicycles bedecked with flowers across the walls of its stores, put bicycles (and flowers) back in the spotlight in the company’s spring catalog. Shot on the streets of Amsterdam — but easily visually transferable to New York, Minneapolis or Seattle — it connects the romance and bo-ho chic of Free People’s clothing and accessories within the fun and ease of using a bicycle to get around town.

HM-Brick-Lane-Bicycles

H + M with Brick Lane Bicycles — The fast-fashion powerhouse, known for collaborations with high-wattage designers like Versace, Jimmy Choo and Karl Lagerfeld, will release a collection of men’s apparel cued by the growing popularity of urban cycling. Designed by H & M and tested by custom-bike specialists Brick Lane Bicycles of East London, the 11 pieces are made with sustainable materials. They incorporate features like venting, pockets and water repellency that lend comfort on a bike. The relaxed, vintage-inspired look makes them easy to wear all day without having to change.

Marc-Jacobs-Ad-Bicycle

Marc Jacobs — Stylists and photographers also enlist the iconography of cycling and bicycles in fashion shoots. We hear (via Instagram) that the Orbea road bicycle in this ad layout for the Marc Jacobs spring ready to wear collection, currently appearing in several spring fashion magazines, belongs to the photographer Juergen Teller, who rode it to the studio and decided to use it in the shoot.

Have you spotted additional examples? Please share them with us by commenting below!

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2 Responses to Fashion Shows the Love for Bicycles

  1. Abbie Durkee says:

    Been thinking long on hard about this cuz I love it! It is high fashion using the bike to market their lines, what strikes me as brilliant, is the selective influence from bike culture on these collections, ie: hipster, boho, black, and colorful costume. The irony is that this is frankly, exactly the opposite of what My Alibi, Iva Jean, Riyoko, Outlieb, Club Ride, etc are trying our hardest to achieve… bringing function to everyday street looks. I love the Bike Love and I am passionate that it will keep rising to allow solidity to our work too!

    • Susi says:

      Abbie, excellent point about the influence of bike culture on these collections. Where I think the industry could find inspiration is in fashion’s emphasis on a lifestyle that incorporates bikes for fun and transportation. In other words, the imagery that editors and stylists use communicates the joy that we associate with riding a bike, while the majority of the bicycling world remains focused on bicycle features — notably those associated with performance and speed and oriented toward older males. That model is outdated and does little to recognize key demographic shifts in this country that are changing the calculus of bike sales. Thanks, as always, for reading.

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